deborah: the Library of Congress cataloging numbers for children's literature, technology, and library science (Default)
This is primarily just a collection of links, pointing to some of the current activities of the Digital Publishing Working group. I'm posting from the conference where I can't dictate, so I'm not adding much context. But please feel free to ask me questions.

To begin with, here's the briefest of introductions to the core standards body: The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), and the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI). There rest of my presentation covers the accessibility activities of the Digital Publishing Interest Group (DPUG IG). I'm an Invited Expert on DPUB IG, and I'm a co-chair of the DPUB IG Accessibility task force, with Charles LaPierre of Benetech.

You can follow many of the activities of the DPUB IG on the W3C blog, category digital publishing, RSS, [syndicated profile] dpub_w3c_feed.

deborah: the Library of Congress cataloging numbers for children's literature, technology, and library science (Default)
It's funny that, given the ostensible webbiness of the attendees of TPAC, that the W3C 20th Anniversary / WWW 25th Anniversary celebration was so much very much not touched by 21st-century remix culture. Personally, I would even have passed up the obvious opportunity for vidding Sir Tim as Sergeant Pepper teaching the band to play and gone instead for the relationship between all of us as Golde and the Web as Tevye in "Do You Love Me?"

Do I love the Web?
For twenty-five years I've lived with it
Fought with it, yelled at it
Twenty-five years I'm in this biz
If that's not love, what is?


This terrible video remix idea brought to you from the realization that every time someone asks me what my languages are and I respond "Perl and Python" I get earwormed by Nicki Minaj:

Perl and Python
We're overdosing
I'm angry but I still love you
deborah: the Library of Congress cataloging numbers for children's literature, technology, and library science (Default)
In the general pool of "people who have something to say about Web accessibility," the only reason I don't call myself an expert is because I have a deep aversion to calling myself an expert anything. I am sitting here right now trying to come up with jokes about where I do have expertise -- napping? reading? cat snuggling? -- and I am actually talking myself down from all of them.

I implement and explain the accessibility standards. I test for accessibility on all spectra except cognitive. I write accessible HTML and JS, and debug other people's code. I teach and present on the the bureaucratic, technical, and content aspects of creating an accessible web. I know where my weaknesses are (cognitive accessibility, legal aspects, mobile, etc), but I know where to turn to complement those weaknesses. All in all, I have always been confident in my knowledge in any room full of accessibility professionals.

Then I got involved with the W3C.

Now that I'm co-leading the accessibility folks for the Digital Publishing Interest Group, I'm basically floored every day my how much sheer knowledge there is on the team. Sure, I have a lot in the can about straightforward web accessibility, but there's so much more regarding the interactions between accessibility and digital publishing, and my colleagues know it.
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