deborah: the Library of Congress cataloging numbers for children's literature, technology, and library science (Default)
Along with Anne Sauer and Eliot Wilczek, I've just had a new paper published: "Archival Description in OAI-ORE", in the Journal of Digital Information, a free, green open access journal. This is a version of a paper which we presented last year at Open Repositories 2010, and mercifully, has been greatly improved since the draft of the paper I wrote while running a temperature of 102°.

This paper, by the way, is our attempt to COMPLETELY REVOLUTIONIZE ARCHIVES AND CHANGE THE LAWS OF PHYSICS. Sort of. Revolutionize archival description using new technology, anyway. Changing the laws of physics will have to wait until we get grant funding.
deborah: the Library of Congress cataloging numbers for children's literature, technology, and library science (Default)
Yesterday, on the DCA blog, I posted "Accessibility and back office archives tools", for which I made a screencast of myself using NaturallySpeaking to use a less-than accessible tool. There was enough positive feedback about the screenreader screencasts to which I linked that I thought there might be some interest in these as well.




In an entirely unrelated aside, when did it become acceptable for un*x programs to start shoving everything -- configuration, logs, state, data -- into /usr/local? (Yes, Tomcat, I'm looking at you.) In my day, whippersnappers, you put your configuration into /etc, your logs into /var/log, your state into /var/run, and your data into whatever was appropriate based on your file system. With obvious modifications based on what operating system you are actually running, maybe using /opt or something instead of /usr/local, etc. In theory, you should be able to get by without even backing up /usr/local, because you could rebuild it completely from source or package, what with all your configuration and state and logs being stored in other places. And as a side effect, it always had a very controllable and knowable size, because it didn't have things like logs that grow arbitrarily if unexpected things happen, and sometimes are exceedingly difficult to roll on a regular basis, and yes, Tomcat, I am still looking at you.

Is this based on a theory of file system management that changed while I haven't been paying attention, or is it just sloppiness based to the new ubiquity of good un*x package management?
deborah: the Library of Congress cataloging numbers for children's literature, technology, and library science (Default)
This wonderful. The Nebraska Library commission has been making archived copies of Creative Commons published works and cataloging them into their OPAC. They aren't doing this indiscriminately; they are only grabbing works which are in line with their collection development policy. They are also making spiral-bound printed copies of those works for which the license allows it, and shelving them in the physical collection.

What a fabulous, fabulous mashup of old and new.

(And does it say something about my reading habits that I got this link from lisnews and not from boingboing?)
deborah: the Library of Congress cataloging numbers for children's literature, technology, and library science (Default)
You know what I really love? ImageMagick.

I just started a process creating use JPEG images out of 4000 high-quality TIFFs. One line of bash, and now it will run for a while, and I can go do something else.

*loves*
deborah: the Library of Congress cataloging numbers for children's literature, technology, and library science (Default)
I may be a librarian now, and I may be a tcsh user in my every day life, but apparently I still can flex my bash-fu when I have to. Yay for line noise!

export j=1;for i in `ls M*.xml`; do k=${foo-`echo $i|cut -f1 -d.`}; mkdir item_$j;cp ${k}.xml item_$j/dublin_core.xml; echo ${k}.jpg>item_$j/contents;cp
../streams/${k}.jpg item_$j;let j++;done
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