[syndicated profile] fanhackers_feed

Posted by fanhackers

Hi there! I was wondering if you could direct me to any information you might have about graduate programs in which one could formally pursue fan studies (especially a PhD track). I’ve looked around at length and found a wealth of related (though broader) programs situated in cultural studies or media theory, but I wanted to make sure I haven’t overlooked any institutions with an academic culture particularly interested in this field. If you have any answers or suggestions for me, I’d be very appreciative! Thanks.

-Danielle Frankel

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[syndicated profile] fanhackers_feed

Posted by fanhackers

Hello all! I’m requesting information on the (in)visibility of slash as a way of generating angst in fanfic pre-2008. Specifically, I want to know what causes or prevents the queering of canoncially straight characters from being used as the primary source of conflict in slashfic. I’m primarily investigating the Kingdom Hearts and Naruto fandoms right now, but information on any fandom based on a global media commodity (preferable originating in Japan, just for the sake of keeping my claims tenable) would be most welcome. If you were actively reading slash fiction in the early 2000s (or know someone who was) and would like to share you perceptions with me, I’d be most grateful!

-rabidbehemoth

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[syndicated profile] aotus_feed

Posted by David Ferriero

Our fourth strategic goal, our most important goal, focuses on the real treasures of the National Archives–our staff.

The Future statue

Photograph of Female Statue, The Future, Located near the Pennsylvania Avenue Entrance to the National Archives Building, 06/30/1936. National Archives ID: 7657960

 

This goal highlights our commitment to provide our staff with the training, tools and opportunities necessary for the transition into a digital environment. We intend to support staff through creating a culture of empowerment, openness and inclusion through both our processes and new technology. And we want to ensure that we have a diverse workforce, equipped with the skills necessary to fulfill our mission.

The goal of “Building Our Future Through Our People” includes several initiatives. We plan to:

  • Foster an employee development culture to promote learning and leadership by all.
  • Cultivate a robust, well-connected internal communications environment to support informed action at all levels.
  • Implement innovative practices and tools to recruit, sustain, and retain a 21st century workforce.
  • Create new career paths for NARA employees to ensure that we have the necessary competencies and skills in a digital environment.

As you can see from the initiatives, we take our commitment to the staff of the National Archives very seriously.  It is only by providing a supportive environment for our staff that any of our goals may be achieved.

This is the final post … [ Read all ]

[syndicated profile] scholarlyoa_feed

Posted by Jeffrey Beall

 

OMICS Publishing Group's Journal of Thermodynamics & Catalysis.

The “editorial”

This 2012 editorial, “On information thermodynamics and scale invariance in fluid dynamics” was published in OMICS Publishing Group’s Journal of Thermodynamics & Catalysis

Two scientists found the editorial incorrect and misleading and set out to correct the scholarly record. They composed a response and submitted it to the journal, but they found the journal’s editorial process so sloppy that they attempted to withdraw their response, preferring to submit it to a better journal.

However, OMICS published their article anyway, and it appears here.

Meanwhile:

arXiv article

The official response.

The authors’ official  response recently appeared in arXiv, (arXiv:1404.4087 [physics.flu-dyn]) but with this very telling addendum:

Comment on Journal of Thermodynamics & Catalysis

     We also must add some commentary on the Journal of Thermodynamics & Catalysis: we naturally attempted to respond to Di Vita’s criticisms through a discussion paper in that journal. However, after submission we received a poorly typeset proof of the manuscript. We have never seen such poor handling of a manuscript by any journal – indeed one of our names was spelt incorrectly! We did not consider it worthwhile to correct such a proof ourselves, and sought to have it re-typeset – however, we believe this proof went through to publication without our copyright permission or consent. Despite several entreaties from us, the journal does not appear to have attempted to make any correction. Examining their web- site (http://omicsonline.org), the Journal of Thermodynamics & Catalysis does not appear to have an Editor or any scientific oversight, although at time of writing the website appears to be malfunctioning and does not load any hyperlinks.

     Our response to Di Vita’s article is outlined correctly herein. We hereby disassociate ourselves from any version of this manuscript published by the Journal of Thermodynamics & Catalysis.

And, indeed, one of the author’s names is still rendered incorrectly in the article they requested be removed from the OMICS journal, an article that OMICS has not removed.


Mets Defense, Part 2

Apr. 24th, 2014 08:12 am
[personal profile] yendi
As I noted a few days ago, the Mets are going to disappoint me a lot this season, because although great starting pitching and defenses are requirements for a winning team, they're not enough, and a lack of a bullpen will do them in.

But in the meantime, here's three great plays in one, as Kurt Nieuwenhuis throws to Rubén Tejada to Travis d'Arnaud (who makes a perfect tag) to nail the tying run at the plate in the bottom of the ninth. That's what baseball's about.

Confused!

Apr. 23rd, 2014 07:34 pm
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
I am doing a lot! Too much! Yet not enough.

Since Zond7 left Monday night I have suddenly degenerated from my smug routine, forget to eat meals, and there is laundry everywhere. somehow instead of writing extra poetry and living in a nice neat environment I have entered odd workaholic and not taking care of myself mode.

Weird! Instructive!

I think it is also the tramadol and extra coffee. Must fix that tomorrow.

Tea only after 1 cup of coffee, and no tramadol after .. umm..... 1pm?

I wrote to the EFF as i said i would, yesterday i did a fun zine reading thing at DU, I worked quite hard, went to all the meetings ever fucking invented, and hacked some portals whicih was super relaxing and fun, and grocery shopped.

i read from a funny old zine and a section from a newish poem that i think is nearly done.

Cannot do enough at work to feel like i'm on top of things or truly competent. HOw to limit things????? why do i keep on taking more responsiblity?

i do not want to burn out.

also i went to 2 doctor appointments which while not specially stressful or hard, and i went in a cab, were still stressful and hard.

i miss zond7 quite a lot!

i think i need to strictly enforce some hours off even if i can't take a whole day ... which i don't feel that i can....

Wow

Apr. 23rd, 2014 05:54 pm
[personal profile] yendi
“There’s a culture of people in State College that clearly appreciates what Joe has done," says a classy dudebro who realizes that winning football games is so much more important than, you know, not covering up for child rapists.

Incidentally, if I get an alert that anyone on my Kickstarter friends list has sponsored this, we're going to have words.

(no subject)

Apr. 23rd, 2014 11:56 am
owlectomy: A squashed panda sewing a squashed panda (Default)
[personal profile] owlectomy
I liked Rae Carson's The Bitter Kingdom well enough but increasingly feel like I'm just not on the right wavelength when it comes to traditional/epic YA fantasy. (I am trying not to be hung up on "Why couldn't I get Sparks and Ashes to work????" but I would like to try to sell it eventually to someone...)

Of course, it's also 3rd in a trilogy where I haven't read the other two books -- it's a book I have to present on for a library booktalk -- and I'm sure that doesn't help. I was able to parse the plot that had come before just fine, but felt like there was a lot of character development that would've felt more meaningful with more setup.

Part of the problem may be that I'm not very interested in, and tried to write a fantasy novel entirely without, long journeys through the wilderness and nobles doing politics. (My issue with politics in fantasy is a bit like my issue with science in hard science fiction: you can deal with it at a simplistic level and get everything wrong, or you can deal with it at a sophisticated level and be kind of boring and pedantic, and it takes a really brilliant writer to not fall into either of those.)
[syndicated profile] fanhackers_feed

Posted by fanhackers

[P]arafanfiction…refers to a particular subset of parafictional art that claims to be fanfiction of, or some other record of, an external media object that does not actually exist. The most notable examples of this are the Homestuck Anime and Squiddles, both of which are spinoffs of the actual Homestuck hypercomic. The idea with those projects is to fabricate an entire alternate reality where Homestuck is an anime and the in-comic show Squiddles actually exists. The fans participating in these projects create objects ostensibly taken directly from the shows in question—screencaps, pictures of old VHS tapes, GameBoy Advance cartridges, gif edits, and so on and so forth—in order to sell the idea that these shows actually exist.

Parafanfiction and Oppositional Fandom by

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[syndicated profile] fanhackers_feed

Posted by fanhackers

Generally speaking, media fandom operates on a labor theory of value—not necessarily in the Marxist sense of the phrase, but in the sense that value derives from work. Fandom’s gift economy assigns special worth to “gifts of time and skill” (Hellekson 2009, 115), gifts made by fans for fans. The worth of these gifts lies not simply in the content of the gift, nor in the social gesture of giving, but in the labor that went into their creation. Commercially purchased gifts, such as the virtual cupcakes and balloons that can be purchased in the LiveJournal shop, may be given and appreciated, but will generally be worth less, in the context of fandom, than gifts made by the giver (note 2). This labor theory of value is often invisible or unarticulated until something goes wrong: a site skin doesn’t work as anticipated, a vid is plagiarized, a story in progress—or an entire archive—is abandoned. These events remind us that our experience of fandom depends on the labor of others: “A gift is a thing we do not get by our own efforts. We cannot buy it; we cannot acquire it through an act of will. It is bestowed upon us” (Hyde 1979, xi).

Tisha Turk, Fan work: Labor, worth, and participation in fandom’s gift economy ift.tt/1g9d3Vi

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[syndicated profile] aotus_feed

Posted by David Ferriero

In this goal we recognize that public access to government information creates measurable economic value, which adds to the enduring cultural, historical, and evidentiary value of our records.

Maximize Value
National Archives Identifier: 196401

When we talk about economic value, we are not talking about the appraised value or the replacement value of our records. Historically, we have talked about economic value in terms of the large number of jobs and economic activity that NARA generates. Examples include the local economic activity generated around our public programs; the numerous professional researchers and authors who write non-fiction and best-selling works of fiction based on NARA records; popular films that came to fruition only because of the existence and hard work of the National Archives.

“Maximize NARA’s Value to the Nation” charts a course forward from this legacy. The course forward supports our transition to digital government, so that we can quickly and efficiently provide public access to our records. We want to ensure our historical government data is accessible by customers when they need it and in the format or technology platform that is easy for them to use. And when we talk about economic value today, we are not talking about commercial value only. We are expanding this idea beyond a simple commercial concept, to consider the social valuation of our returns on investment. These are opportunities to … [ Read all ]

[syndicated profile] scholarlyoa_feed

Posted by Jeffrey Beall

International Research Promotion Council

Snake oil research.

You may receive an unexpected email from the International Research Promotion Council telling you that you’ve been nominated for the “Eminent Scientist of the Year Award.” I think it’s a scam.

The email will come from Ms. Sarika. S. Anil, writing for the chairperson, Dr. Alice Franklin (who is too busy to deal with this trivial stuff).

International Research Promotion Council

Don’t ask Alice.

Seeking clarification, I have emailed and telephoned Dr. Franklin, but she doesn’t reply.

The nomination letter states, “The award will be announced through an award special journal published exclusively for this purpose.” That journal is the irregular Recent Advances and Research Updates, published only when they have content and generally not made available to the public. I suspect that there is a hefty fee charged to the award winners to publish their work in the journal. I question the authenticity of this award and suspect that it’s a gimmick to draw attention to the “International Research Promotion Council” and to get money from the award winners and others.

The rules and regulations for the award indicate that there are multiple awards given out each year.

This outfit publishes one additional journal, the Austral-Asian Journal of Cancer. I think it’s a low quality journal, and I was easily able to find plagiarism in it.

I don’t see a legitimate need for an “International Research Promotion Council” as pretty much every university in the world is already promoting research. The council — like the Eminent Scientist of the Year Award — looks fake to me.

Hat tip: Dr. Elizabeth V. Arkema


[personal profile] yendi
The Mets won't offer me a whole lot of joy this year, but this double play will go on the highlight reels for both Tejada and Murphy.
[syndicated profile] philipnel_feed

Posted by Philip Nel

Uncensor KansasParticipating in today’s “Five On the Hour: Stand for Freedom of Speech,” I’m posting the statements I prepared for my two classes. In practice, I ended up improvising. During my first class (English 725: African American Children’s Literature), I realized that I should have started with the connection to the class and then moved out to the Kansas Board of Regents, and so I began re-structuring things on the fly. During my second class, I was much looser, using the statement only as a broad guideline — I began with the connection to the work we were reading (The Watsons Go to Birmingham — 1963), and then moved out to the Regents’ repressive social media policy.

So. What you see below is not what I read in each class. They’re what I planned to read.


Engl 725: African American Children’s Literature | Engl 355: Literature for Children


ENGLISH 725: AFRICAN AMERICAN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

Five on the Hour: Freedom of Speech and Higher Education

Philip Nel

I’m going to take the next five minutes to say a few words about Freedom of Speech, and why it’s important in higher education in general and in African American Children’s Literature in particular. Back in December, as you were taking exams, faculty were grading exams, and everyone was preparing to leave town, the Kansas Board of Regents imposed a new social media policy, which they passed over the objections of all faculty, students and administration present at their meeting.

The policy says all speech expressed through social media (Facebook, Twitter, blog, any website, email) can be grounds for firing. Employees (faculty, staff, student employees) may not say anything that’s “contrary to the best interest of the university,” nor may they utter something that “impairs discipline by superiors or harmony among co-workers.” Those terms are so broad as to encompass any speech. As many have noted, this policy creates a repressive climate for the free exchange of ideas — which is at the heart of what we do at a university.

The university is a community of scholars. We discover new knowledge and create new ideas. These ideas are different than what has come before, and difference can be controversial. Indeed, sometimes our ideas challenge social mores. To test our ideas, we debate them, refine them, change them. This process of creation and discovery — evaluated through open and unfettered dialogue — is the means by which our civilization progresses. And the only environment under which this process can occur is an environment of free speech.

Robin Bernstein, Racial InnocenceThere are of course many examples from African American Children’s Literature. As Robin Bernstein has shown us, until relatively recently the notion that children of color can feel just as acutely as white children can feel was not part of the dominant culture in the U.S. Topsy, the Golliwog, and their many descendants propagated the lie that African American children were thicker-skinned and less human than white children. And thus, the notion that black children would deserve a literature that spoke to their experiences was also not an accepted truth. Once, people accepted these ideas as true. But then other people challenged these ideas. We — well, a majority of Americans, at any rate — now regard the notion that African American children would be any less human than white children to be absurd, racist, nonsense. And, though the publishing industry has much work yet to do, there are now books that address the many experiences of growing up black, Latino/a, Native American, or Asian American in the U.S.

But to recognize the foolishness in established “truths” about childhood and children’s literature, we need the freedom to question those “truths.” We need freedom of speech.

So, even though the Regents announced their policy when people were least likely to notice, it did not slip by unnoticed. From across the state, across the country, and across the world people condemned it. Our own local paper, The Manhattan Mercury, called the policy “an anti-free speech manifesto that sounds like a pronouncement from the government of a banana republic.” Our student government has called for its suspension, as has KU’s, as have student governments across the state. All faculty senates have spoken against it. All university presidents have, too.

In response, the Regents then appointed a workgroup of representatives from all Regents campuses to revise their policy. The workgroup crafted a model policy that offers guidelines for speech, but respects the right to freedom of speech. Were the regents to follow the advice that they solicited, Kansas — for a change — could be in the news for doing something thoughtful, even admirable. Yet, at the Regents’ meeting last week, they signaled that they would retain the original policy, but add some of the workgroup’s language affirming freedom of speech. So, in May, I expect they will announce their new, “compromise” policy, which both threatens freedom of speech and yet alleges to uphold it.

Questions of freedom of speech are frequently a concern of children’s literature: most of the books on the ALA’s annual banned books list are books for children or adolescents. Many of the books we have read this semester raise, quite explicitly, the question of what’s appropriate for children. For most of its history, America has been a white supremacist police state. Implicitly and explicitly, African American children’s literature confronts facts about America that most Americans prefer not to think about.

So, here are some resources where you can learn more about this issue.

The Board of Regents will probably vote on this at their May 14th meeting. The workgroup presented the revised policy at the April 16th meeting.



ENGLISH 355: LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN

Five on the Hour: Freedom of Speech and Higher Education

Philip Nel

I’m going to take the next five minutes to say a few words about Freedom of Speech, and why it’s important in higher education in general and children’s literature in particular. Back in December, as you were taking exams, faculty were grading exams, and everyone was preparing to leave town, the Kansas Board of Regents imposed a new social media policy, which they passed over the objections of all faculty, students and administration present at their meeting.

The policy says all speech expressed through social media (Facebook, Twitter, blog, any website, email) can be grounds for firing. Employees (faculty, staff, student employees) may not say anything that’s “contrary to the best interest of the university,” nor may they utter something that “impairs discipline by superiors or harmony among co-workers.” Those terms are so broad as to encompass any speech. As many have noted, this policy creates a repressive climate for the free exchange of ideas — which is at the heart of what we do at a university.

The university is a community of scholars. We discover new knowledge and create new ideas. These ideas are different than what has come before, and difference can be controversial. Indeed, sometimes our ideas challenge social mores. To test our ideas, we debate them, refine them, change them. This process of creation and discovery — evaluated through open and unfettered dialogue — is the means by which our civilization progresses. And the only environment under which this process can occur is an environment of free speech.

Here’s an example. Earlier in the term, I told you that the notion that children deserve their own literature is a relatively recent one. And that, a hundred years ago, experts argued that women should not be allowed to attend college because it would make them infertile (all that blood going to the brain would deprive the womb of blood, you see). Once, people accepted these ideas as true. But then other people challenged these ideas. Now, we recognize that children, cognitively, are different than adults, and indeed that “children” itself is a very broad category: children at nine tend to have more developed cognitive abilities than children at three. Now, we recognize that women can learn without becoming infertile. Indeed, we regard these earlier ideas as laughable. Ridiculous.

But to recognize the foolishness in established “truths,” we need the freedom to question those “truths.” We need freedom of speech.

So, even though the Regents announced their policy when people were least likely to notice, it did not slip by unnoticed. From across the state, across the country, and across the world people condemned it. Our own local paper, The Manhattan Mercury, called the policy “an anti-free speech manifesto that sounds like a pronouncement from the government of a banana republic.” Our student government has called for its suspension, as has KU’s, as have student governments across the state. All faculty senates have spoken against it. All university presidents have, too.

Christopher Paul Curtis, The Watsons Go to Birmingham — 1963In response, the Regents then appointed a workgroup of representatives from all Regents campuses to revise their policy. The workgroup crafted a model policy that offers guidelines for speech, but respects the right to freedom of speech. Were the regents to follow the advice that they solicited, Kansas — for a change — could be in the news for doing something thoughtful, even admirable. Yet, at the Regents’ meeting last week, they signaled that they would retain the original policy, but add some of the workgroup’s language affirming freedom of speech. So, in May, I expect they will announce their new, “compromise” policy, which both threatens freedom of speech and yet alleges to uphold it.

Questions of freedom of speech are frequently a concern of children’s literature: most of the books on the ALA’s annual banned books list are books for children or adolescents. The book we are reading right now — Christopher Paul Curtis’s The Watsons Go to Birmingham — 1963 — raises, quite explicitly, the question of what’s appropriate for children. The Watson children cope with the trauma inflicted by racist white terrorists who kill black children. This is serious stuff. And it’s an award-winning children’s book.

So, here are some resources where you can learn more about this issue.

The Board of Regents will probably vote on this at their May 14th meeting. The workgroup presented the revised policy at the April 16th meeting.

[syndicated profile] kirkus_kidlit_feed
As the first-ever Wimpy Kid Month slogs its way to its epic climax on April 28 with the reveal of the title and color of the next volume in Jeff Kinney’s wildly popular Diary of a Wimpy Kid series, it is probably worth spending some time to reflect on what can legitimately be called a phenomenon.
[personal profile] mjg59
I picked up a Panasonic BDT-230 a couple of months ago. Then I discovered that even though it appeared fairly straightforward to make it DVD region free (I have a large pile of PAL region 2 DVDs), the US models refuse to play back PAL content. We live in an era of software-defined functionality. While Panasonic could have designed a separate hardware SKU with a hard block on PAL output, that would seem like unnecessary expense. So, playing with the firmware seemed like a reasonable start.

Panasonic provide a nice download site for firmware updates, so I grabbed the most recent and set to work. Binwalk found a squashfs filesystem, which was a good sign. Less good was the block at the end of the firmware with "RSA" written around it in large letters. The simple approach of hacking the firmware, building a new image and flashing it to the device didn't appear likely to work.

Which left dealing with the installed software. The BDT-230 is based on a Mediatek chipset, and like most (all?) Mediatek systems runs a large binary called "bdpprog" that spawns about eleventy billion threads and does pretty much everything. Runnings strings over that showed, well, rather a lot, but most promisingly included a reference to "/mnt/sda1/vudu/vudu.sh". Other references to /mnt/sda1 made it pretty clear that it was the mount point for USB mass storage. There were a couple of other constraints that had to be satisfied, but soon attempting to run Vudu was actually setting a blank root password and launching telnetd.

/acfg/config_file_global.txt was the next stop. This is a set of tokens and values with useful looking names like "IDX_GB_PTT_COUNTRYCODE". I tried changing the values, but unfortunately made a poor guess - on next reboot, the player had reset itself to DVD region 5, Blu Ray region C and was talking to me in Russian. More inconveniently, the Vudu icon had vanished and I couldn't launch a shell any more.

But where there's one obvious mechanism for running arbitrary code, there's probably another. /usr/local/bin/browser.sh contained the wonderful line:
export LD_PRELOAD=/mnt/sda1/bbb/libSegFault.so
, so then it was just a matter of building a library that hooked open() and launched inetd and dropping that into the right place, and then opening the browser.

This time I set the country code correctly, rebooted and now I can actually watch Monkey Dust again. Hurrah! But, at the same time, concerning. This software has been written without any concern for security, and it listens on the network by default. If it took me this little time to find two entirely independent ways to run arbitrary code on the device, it doesn't seem like a stretch to believe that there are probably other vulnerabilities that can be exploited with less need for physical access.

The depressing part of this is that there's no reason to believe that Panasonic are especially bad here - especially since a large number of vendors are shipping much the same Mediatek code, and so probably have similar (if not identical) issues. The future is made up of network-connected appliances that are using your electricity to mine somebody else's Dogecoin. Our nightmarish dystopia may be stranger than expected.
[syndicated profile] alaskanlibrarian_feed

Posted by Daniel Cornwall

Now that I’ve spent a whole week talking about the benefits of my local public library, it is my devout wish that you will go forth and visit your local library. If you live in Juneau, that would be the Juneau Public Libraries that I’ve been writing about all week. Here are some pointers if you live elsewhere:

 

Ideally you would visit in person. But checking out their website or even Listen Alaska Plus would do. But visit. Then share what you find. On your blog. On Twitter. On Facebook. Whereever suits you.

 

 


Filed under: alaska, libraries Tagged: nlw14
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