trobadora: (Sherlock/Moriarty - in the darkness)
[personal profile] trobadora
[community profile] holmestice reveals have happened! And the whole fest has been so much fun, I can't wait for the next round. I've even already made notes for my next sign-up! Any other Holmes fans around? Because you should absolutely join, it's a blast. :D

(Though I'll really need an ACD icon, or at least a more general Sherlock Holmes one. Not that I haven't been looking ...)

But first, here's the story I wrote for this round:

Title: The Question
Fandom: Sherlock Holmes - ACD
Characters: Sherlock Holmes, Professor Moriarty (with appearances by Lestrade, Watson, and Moran)
Rating: PG-13
Warnings: none
Summary: Of all the unanswered questions I had collected over the course of my career, none weighed upon me as much as that posed by the inexplicable inaction of Professor Moriarty.
A/N: Written for [personal profile] graycardinal during the Holmestice 2017 Summer Round. Many thanks to [personal profile] fluffyllama and [personal profile] wojelah for all their help!

Originally posted at the Holmestice comm and at AO3.

The Question )

Learning To Get Around In Java

Jun. 27th, 2017 06:52 pm
[syndicated profile] sumana_feed
One of Changeset Consulting's clients is working on modernizing a legacy web application; we're improving both its structural underpinnings and its user interface and outgoing APIs. It is like we are Chief O'Brien in the first season of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, surveying and retrofitting Terok Nor. But that's not a fair comparison; O'Brien has to not only grapple with alien engineering approaches, but with the resentful and deliberate trashing the Cardassians inflicted on the station before handing it over. I haven't seen Stargate Atlantis but perhaps that's a better analogy; with every component of this long-asleep lost city that we resuscitate, a new console or room shimmers to life. Which is pretty rewarding!

The original authors wrote this application in Java. I've never worked on a Java application before, so the last few weeks have been quite an education in the Java ecosystem, in its tools and frameworks and libraries. We're improving the installation and deployment process, so now I'm more familiar with Ant, Gradle, Maven, OpenJDK, JDBC, Hibernate, and WildFly. I've gotten some API documentation in place, so now I know more about Spring and Javadoc.

As I was explaining to a friend this weekend, the overwhelming thing isn't Java as a language. It is a programming language and you can program in it, fine. The overwhelmption is the seemingly endless chain of plugins, platforms, and frameworks, and the mental work to understand what competes with, supersedes, integrates with, or depends on what.

Imagine you come to visit New York City for the first time, and wish to visit a specific address. First you need to work out where it is. But you do not have a map; there is no unified map of the whole place. Surely you can figure this out. Watch out: if someone doesn't tell you what borough an address is in, it's probably in Manhattan, but then again maybe not. There are multiple streets with the same name, and "31st Street and Broadway" in Queens is quite far from "31st Street and Broadway" in Manhattan. The avenue numbers go up westwards in Manhattan, eastwards in Brooklyn, and northwards in Queens. And so on.

You ask around, you see sketches of maps other people have made on their journeys, and eventually you feel pretty confident that you know the rough distance and direction to your destination. Now, how do you get there from your hotel room?

You probably don't want to walk all the way; for one thing, it's illegal and dangerous to walk on the freeways. This is why we have the subway (express and local), and buses (express and local, both privately and publicly run), and government-regulated taxis (street-hailable cabs and private car services), and bike rental, and commuter rail, a funicular/tram, car rental, ferries, and so on. Also there are illegal rideshare/taxi services that lots of people use. You try to learn some nouns and figure out what sort of thing each is, and what's a subset of what.

A MetroCard works on some of these modes and not others, and some transfers from one ride to another cost you nothing, and you can't use an unlimited-ride card twice at the same station or on the same bus within 18 minutes.* You can bring a bike on some MTA-run services but not all, not all the time. There are whole neighborhoods with no subway service, and whole neighborhoods with approximately no street parking. At rush hour the trains get super full. Service changes at night, on the weekend, and on holidays. Cars and buses get stuck behind accidents and parades. People and signs in Manhattan refer to "uptown" and "downtown" as though they are cardinal directions; they often correlate to "north" and "south" but not always. Metro North trains terminate at Grand Central, but Long Island Railroad trains terminate at New York Penn Station, which is named after Pennsylvania because it's where you can catch a train to Pennsylvania,** and there's a Newark Penn Station too but over a crackling loudspeaker those two station names sound very similar so watch out. And so on.

You're lucky; you find a set of cryptic directions, from your hotel to the destination address, based on a five-year-old transit schedule. It suggests you take a bus that does not exist anymore. Sometimes you see descriptions of travel that you think could be feasible as a leg of your journey, and you read what other people have done. They talk about "Penn Station" and "the train" without disambiguating, refer to the subway as "the MTA" even though the MTA also runs other transit, talk about "the 7" without distinguishing local from express, and use "blocks" as a measure of distance even though some blocks are ten times as long as others.

Aaaaagh. And yet: you will make it. You will figure it out. New Yorkers will help you along the way.

The decades-old Java ecosystem feels overwhelming but this application overhaul is like any other task. Things are made of stuff. Human programmers made this thing and human programmers can understand and manipulate it. I'm a human programmer. I made Javadoc do what I wanted it to do, and now the product is better and our users will have more information. And every triumph earns me a skill I can deploy for other customers and groups I care about.

* Just long enough for you to enjoy a little break from the podcast you're making with President Nixon!
** Also see St. Petersburg's Finland Station.

Dear Fic Corner Scribbler,

Jun. 26th, 2017 08:10 pm
alixtii: Player from <i>Where on Earth Is Carmen Sandiego?</i> playing the game. (Default)
[personal profile] alixtii
I made my character requests based on the fact that the exchange is set up to match ANY, not ALL to increase odds of matching--i.e. I requested all the characters I nominated, because I'd be interested in seeing any combination of them in a fic. Sometimes a couple of characters are associated with one possible prompt, while the others are associated with a different one. I don't expect, and the rules don't require, you to include all of them in the same fic (although of course you are free to do so).

That said, I like female characters being awesome (which can take many different forms!) and having agency; I like femslash and female friendship; I like fluff and darkfic and pretty much everything in between. I like gen and porn with plot and pretty much everything in between. I like polyamory where the women outnumber the men. I'm fine with character death, BDSM, mpreg, chan, noncon, dubcon, incest, and cross-gen. I don't mind experimental uses of tense, POV, or story structure or formatting. I have few squicks and no triggers. Feel free to twist or subvert the canons without worrying you'll be ruining my childhood. I promise you, you won't be.

The Squad - Jennifer Lynn Barnes

I was pimped into this fandom by [personal profile] fox1013 and you can read my original squeeful reactions to the first book here. I ILL'd the books at first but now own both of the audiobooks narrated by Amanda Ronconi.

I love all the characters I nominated (and most of the ones I didn't) and any chance to spend some time with them would be great. Femslash would be great, especially Toby/Chloe, Toby/Tara, or Brittany/Tiffany, because let's face it, part of the appeal (at least for me) is all of the homoerotic overtones between the cheerleader spies. I'm also interested in het involving Noah, either Noah/Lucy or Noah/Brittany/Tiffany, especially from Toby's POV (although from the POV of one of the other squad members would be interesting, too).

Maybe Toby could have Tara over for dinner, only to find out that Noah has also invited Lucy? I'd love to see the Klein parents get involved too.

If you want to do something more plotty or action-adventurey, that's fine too, as long as there's still a large character-driven element, even if it's not romantic in nature.

The only thing I'm really not interested in is het involving Toby or anything involving Jack Peyton.

Die unendliche Geschichte | The Neverending Story - Michael Ende

I half a bunch of half-formed ideas which could potentially serve as prompts. I'd be thrilled if you took none, one, or more than one of these ideas and ran with them.

I'm interested in the theodicy of Phantásien/Fantasia/Fantastica. What does the Empress think of Xayide and her battle? How do these two interact with each other when they meet? Femslash, whether hatesex or something with more complicated power dynamics, would be awesome here, but so would thoughtful gen.

I'm also interested in Bastian after his return to reality. We know that Gmork has the ability to pass between worlds; what if he was recreated when the rest of Phantásien was, and encounters Bastian in the real world? Would he try to destroy Phantásien working from the real world this time, perhaps by destroying The Neverending Story itself? (Is there more than one copy of The Neverending Story in existence? If so, does Gmork know this? Does Bastian? Does Koreander/Coreander?)

The Ende novel was published in 1979, which would make Bastian about 50 today. What would Bastian (and/or Koreander, if he is still alive) think of a world of smart phones and e-books and AO3 and Netflix? Does Koreander's Old Books still exist, perhaps run by Bastian? Is it struggling to stay afloat? How do they respond to the teens of today, or even older Millennials?

I'm also interested in Bastian's friend Christa, to whom he would tell stories before she left for boarding school. What happens when they meet again after his return from Phantásien? Does he tell her about it? How does she respond? Do they enter into a romantic relationship when they get older? (Alternately, I could see her daughter potentially acting as a viewpoint character if you choose to go with the "50-year-old Bastian in 2017" prompt.)

Gallagher Girls Series - Ally Carter

Either Cameron/Josh, or else any femslash pairing involving the core four girls. Please no Cameron/Zach, and I don't really care about Abby/Edward (although I don't object to it).

If you want to go the het route, what if Cameron and Amirah ran into Josh after they escape from the Academy in the final book, and they had to rely on him helping them to hide from the Circle?

As for femslash, any romance in which two or more of the girls get together would be great. Or else go established relationship in which Presidential candidate James McHenry finds out that his daughter's girlfriend is actually there to give him his CIA briefing. (Liz would probably make the most sense, since she's the analyst, but feel free to play with the concept to make it work for you.)

Escape to Witch Mountain - Alexander Key

Tia and Tony, either as a twincest pairing or as a deeply cathective platonic sibling relationship. Any point during (or before or after) canon, or diverging from canon, is fine.

from the department of random

Jun. 26th, 2017 08:41 pm
trobadora: (Castiel - headache)
[personal profile] trobadora
Oops, where did the last month go? I seem to have fallen out of the habit of regular posting again, so let's make an effort to change that. Some random things I neglected to post about recently:
  1. Wayward Daughters is actually happening! Well, it's called Wayward Sisters, but still – I never thought this would actually happen. Here's hoping it takes off, I really want this show.

  2. Bizarre yoghurt flavour of the day: coffee/orange/chocolate balls. Not bad, actually!

  3. [community profile] holmestice: the anonymous period is nearly over, and I actually managed to read almost everything I meant to read, yay! Some lovely fic in there, including my own gift, an ACD Holmes/Moriarty fic about the early period of Holmes becoming aware of Moriarty's existence. Fabulous! ♥

    And here's a guessing post, if anyone wanted to take a stab at guessing what I might have written. Not that it's any great mystery if you know me at all, or have been listening to my Sherlockian ramblings for the last few months. *g*

  4. Doctor Who: MISSY MISSY MISSY. I'm so in love with her, and with the show, and I really need to write a proper post, but the suspense is killing me, and I really need to see the finale before I can properly sort out my thoughts. In the mean time: OMG MISSY!!!!!1!!11!eleventy!1!

  5. Over on [community profile] wintercompanion, we're busy preparing for Summer/Winter Holidays, which will start on the 1st. Some really fabulous entries again! And we're still waiting for more.

  6. My [community profile] everywoman fic still needs some editing, and then I need to spend the weekend focusing on my NPT fic. Why is everythin so busy at the moment, including work? *hides under blanket*

There, that's a start, right? Here's hoping I'll manage to post more frequently again!

Cabins in the Woods

Jun. 26th, 2017 05:56 pm
[syndicated profile] kirkus_ya_feed
There are five cabins of girls at Camp So-and-So this year, and five vastly different camping experiences. Almost immediately upon arrival:

Tweet the Declaration of Independence

Jun. 26th, 2017 04:05 pm
[syndicated profile] aotus_feed

Posted by davidferriero

The National Archives is proud to partner with Slate to co-host the #TinyDeclaration contest on Twitter. Slate originated the contest in 2010. This year, we are inviting the public (that means you!) to try to capture the essence of the Declaration of Independence in 140 characters or less, and tweet it out, using the hashtag: #TinyDeclaration.

The contest starts at noon on Monday June 26, and ends at noon on Thursday, June 29th. I will be judging the contest, along with the Editor-in-Chief of Slate, Julia Turner, and author Brad Meltzer. Finalists will be announced Friday on Slate.com.

The winner will receive some fun Founding Fathers swag from the National Archives Foundation: a July 4 t-shirt, a mug, a dapper pair of socks with images of George Washington, and of course, a copy of the Declaration of Independence. You can check out the swag and more at our shop.

July 4th Tweet the Declaration contest prize

Come on down to the National Archives on the 4th, where I will read the winning tweet aloud during our Fourth of July ceremony. Will you be the winner?

(no subject)

Jun. 24th, 2017 01:01 pm
sanguinity: woodcut by M.C. Escher, "Snakes" (Default)
[personal profile] sanguinity
[community profile] holmestice finished posting! Reveals are on the 27th; in the meanwhile go and admire all the lovely things! I particularly recommend my own gift, "The Case of the Deceased Marmalade Thief", which is an utter delight.

--


It's been ages since my last proper update. Highlights!

I got a camera for my birthday back in March...

obligatory kitty pics )

obligatory I-can't-stand-my-face selfies )

Then the current round of Holmestice began, PRECISELY when the Livejournal TOS fuckery hit the fan. I will not say that this round has been a clusterfuck, because I think it mostly hasn't been? But pulling off this round has been more effort and cursing than any of us planned for. Happily, I have great co-mods, and there is wonderful satisfaction in looking at ALL THE THINGS and knowing we facilitated that happening. Even if we're still trying to finish backing up the damn comm.

In early May we went to Colorado and Wyoming for a week to visit [personal profile] grrlpup's family. Not half an hour out of the airport, we got caught in an impressive hailstorm; Grrlpup is still wrangling with the rental car and insurance companies over how many thousands of dollars that storm is or isn't going to cost us. The rest of the trip was pretty good, but socially taxing. As always, it was wonderful to see her friends and family; as always, I was very happy to get back home again.

In June, [personal profile] grrlpup had her birthday. We have become my parents' generation: when I asked her what she wanted for her birthday, she asked that I actually do that one home-improvement task I'd been promising to do for two years. So I spent a few days bolting and screwing bookshelves to the wall, while pretending I wasn't doing any such thing.

Her: What are you doing? Are you painting boards? Why are you painting boards?
Me: [flagrantly painting boards] Boards? What boards?

front room shelves )

Later today, [livejournal.com profile] crazy_marcia, for whom we crewed the Badwater Ultra and with whom I used to climb mountains, is coming to visit.

(For those who didn't know me back then, the Badwater Ultra is a 135/143-mile footrace through Death Valley and up to the top of Mt. Whitney, always held during the height of summer. And by "height of summer," I mean 120-degree heat, woot! The two mountains I've climbed with her are both non-trivial: Mt. Whitney by the Mountaineer's Route, and Mt. Rainier, which involves glacier travel, and thus is a technical climb. Both mountains are near-abouts 14,500 feet high and Exciting Shit Went Wrong on both peaks.)

Anyway, I'm weirdly nervous about seeing Marcia -- it's been an age since we last spoke, and I got lazy and fat and don't have adventures anymore, and what if she doesn't like me now??? -- but scanning back over these old trip reports, I feel very silly. We're going to sit around and gossip, not pull one of our what-were-you-even-thinking-people-die-doing-that-shit adventures. What could possibly go down today to be worth being nervous about? I mean, seriously.

(Actually, given that Marcia will be in attendance, I would not be the least bit surprised if we save someone from a close brush with death later today. FURTHER BULLETINS AS EVENTS WARRANT.)
yendi: (Default)
[personal profile] yendi
We got home around 1. When I came upstairs this morning before 8, I found that a couple of cookbooks had been knocked off the kitchen bookshelf. No big deal. Then I noticed that the sample pack of cat food we'd gotten in the mail (Rachel Ray's Delish) was in the dining room and torn open. Sigh. I cleaned it up, went about the rest of the morning routine, and then hit the living room, where the bag of soft duck and pumpkin dog treats was lying there, also torn open.

Sigh.

Normally when there's morning chaos, I know which animal to blame (and this generally seems like Charlotte-style mischief), but I'm not sure all the animals didn't work together. Thankfully, it doesn't look like they ate a ton of the food in either case (I'm not sure Nicky even realized his treats had been opened).

Remember, folks: Having pets is good for your emotional health!
[syndicated profile] nara_feed

Posted by usnationalarchives

Today’s post comes from Kate Mersiovsky, National Archives Technician

Since I’ve become an archives technician in the Innovation Hub Scanning Room at the National Archives, I’ve seen my fair share of interesting records. Researchers have digitized the pension of presidential widow Lucretia Garfield, the pension of Harriet Tubman, and the Supreme Court cases In Re Gault and U.S. v. Edith Windsor. Recently one of my fellow technicians, Jesse Wilinski, found another unique record- the pension file for Mohammed Kahn, a Muslim soldier who served in the Civil War.

It is rare to find records of Muslim Civil War soldiers in our holdings. So far, Jesse has only encountered two pensions, and historians know of only about 250 Muslim Civil War soldiers in all. This record, therefore, sheds light on a unique perspective that is often overlooked. As a Muslim immigrant serving in a white unit, Kahn experienced challenges even more extreme than the hardships normally associated with a 19th century infantryman’s life.

Jesse is always on the lookout for unusual records and has fostered relationships with many of the researchers who come in to study our Civil War pension files. One of these researchers tipped Jesse off to the existence of Kahn’s pension, which he scanned in the Hub during his lunch breaks.

Approved Pension File for Private Mohammed Kahn (alias John Ammahail), Company E, 43rd New York Infantry Regiment (SC-193744), pg. 2. NAID: 63555085

Private Mohammed Kahn, also known as John Ammahail, was born in Persia, circa 1830. Raised in Afghanistan, he immigrated to the United States in 1861. About two months after his arrival he enlisted in the 43rd New York Infantry Regiment, following a night out with friends who convinced him to join.

In his pension application, Kahn recorded the many battles he either took part in or knew to have occurred nearby, the injuries he sustained, and the duties he performed while serving as both a cook and an infantryman. A few days after the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863,  Kahn was separated from his unit and arrested in Hagerstown, Maryland, by a Union guard who brought him to the Provost Marshall’s headquarters. Though Kahn tried to explain that he was a member of the 43rd New York, the guard did not believe him, insisting that he could not be part of a white unit, as he was not a white man. Kahn was eventually sent to Philadelphia with recently escaped slaves to work, where he spent months trying to find his company or anyone else who would help him reunite with the 43rd New York.

When the Battle of the Wilderness started in May 1864, Kahn found a New York regiment – the 14th New York Infantry – that was taking a train down to the battle. In his desperation, he managed to jump on the train as it was pulling out of Philadelphia, and traveled with the 14th to Washington, DC. From the capital, he struck out on foot, following other squadrons down to the front in Spotsylvania, Virginia. He arrived on the last day of the battle and was finally able to rejoin his company in battle. Just fifteen minutes after his return, he was shot in the left hand. Despite this injury, Kahn, once healed, spent the rest of the war as a sharpshooter and ultimately served throughout almost the entire Civil War.

Want to learn more about Private Mohammed Kahn? His digitized pension application is  now available in the National Archives Catalog, where you can help transcribe his story. Visit our Citizen Archivist dashboard to get started.

If you are interested in digitizing Civil War or other pre-World War I military records, come by the Innovation Hub at the National Archives in Washington, DC. We help researchers scan military service records, pensions, bounty land warrant applications, and carded medical records, and add these scans to the Catalog. We’re open Monday through Friday, 9 am to 5 pm. If you have any questions about our citizen scanning project, email us at innovationhub@nara.gov.

 

Building Bridges

Jun. 23rd, 2017 06:34 am
[syndicated profile] kirkus_kidlit_feed
Picture books build bridges in many ways – between children and the adults who share children’s books with them, between children and the life-long pleasures of literature, and (my favorite of all) between children and art appreciation. Two new children’s books on shelves—Lizi Boyd’s I Wrote You a Note and Jacqueline Ayer’s The Paper-Flower Tree—are all about characters who build bridges themselves – and in more ways than one.

Mackenzi Lee

Jun. 23rd, 2017 04:05 am
[syndicated profile] kirkus_ya_feed
In Mackenzi Lee’s first month working at the Harvard Coop while earning her M.F.A in Children’s Literature from Simmons College, the store sold 40 copies of Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein. Until then, they had sold five copies. Total. Customers would say, “ ‘I’m looking for a board book for a baby shower,’ and I would be like, ‘That’s great, but have you read Code Name Verity?’ ” Lee remembers.

Science Gets Graphic

Jun. 22nd, 2017 08:56 pm
[syndicated profile] kirkus_kidlit_feed
It’s a good time, many say a golden age, for graphic novels and comics. The proliferation of such high-quality graphic novels also means that there are publishers out there creating such books specifically for younger readers. (Take TOON Books, for instance. Here is my 2014 Kirkus chat with the Editorial Director, Françoise Mouly, about bringing comics to the easy-reader format.)

Fads of youth

Jun. 21st, 2017 09:25 am
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
I was thinking last night of fads. In the 70s I had an official "Pet Rock" which I loved. The manual on care and training of Pet Rocks was very amusingly written (at least to my 7 year old mind). Pet Rocks were particularly great at learning to "stay" and "play dead". It came in a little carton full of straw with the manual and I think, a leash.

My dad was a good model for how to gently enjoy human absurdity and I remember him being super entertained by the pet rock and playing along with it super well.

He's Baaack!

Jun. 22nd, 2017 09:28 pm
[personal profile] jazzyjj
Why hello to everybody. It has once again been like forever since my last entry. But fear not, I'm still alive and kickin'. I've been busy with mostly good stuff, but with some bad things mixed in. I had a cold and my ears filled up with tons of wax. I was honestly not that sick, but I had a lot of trouble hearing and you can probably imagine how tough that gets for a blind guy like me, lol! But anyhow, I had eardrops put in both ears and then they were flushed out last week. Actually the process of flushing them out was kinda cool. I had it done once prior to last week, a few years back at the same office. For those of you who have never had this done, it tickles a bit. But I'm ticklish so that wasn't bad at all.





The other bad thing that happened was that my toilet seat busted. The good news however, is that just a few nights ago when my awesome father dropped me off here after a lovely Father's Day weekend, he brought not one, but 2 new toilet seats and lids and his toolbox and went to work. So I now have a brand-new seat and lid on my toilet. I have since had occasion to use the toilet in my apartment, and had no trouble thus far. I cannot thank my father enough for what he did. In addition, I cannot thank my neighbor across the hall enough for letting me invade his bathroom. Even though his bathroom is honestly not that great of a place, I was able to take care of business in there.

my political sentimentality

Jun. 20th, 2017 11:50 am
brainwane: My smiling face in front of a brick wall, May 2015. (Default)
[personal profile] brainwane
From "An Excerpt From My Definitely Not a Presidential Campaign Book" by Alexandra Petri, Washington Post, June 5, 2017:


People always ask me what I'm passionate about, and I tell them the following story: When I was a little kid, my grandmother took me to see an injustice. I got so mad! I threw my red white and blue popsicle down on the ground. My grandmother picked it up and said, "Winner, these colors are sacred. Never let them drop." And I said, "I know, Grandma, but I don't like to see injustice!" and she said, "That's just the world we live in. Unless you grow up and devise common-sense policy solutions to do something about it. And don't forget the men who died to give that right to you, and proudly stand up to defend her still today."

....

I think sex is bad unless it falls into one of the five categories below that also conveniently align with my policy proposals:

-- you are thinking about tax reform during it
-- other people are having it and you are vocally disapproving of it
-- at least one of the people involved is committed to being a great dad
-- it involves one willing participant who is a male celebrity
-- it is binding Americans together and serving to restore our common values


So one way I know that I am hopelessly sentimental about civic virtue and so on, and that part of me is an utter sucker for "common-sense policy solutions"/"binding Americans together"-type rhetoric, is that even this parody makes me mist up a little bit. Also I have literally cried (albeit on an airplane) at a Doritos ad that championed bipartisanship.

(As a young'un I came across a copy of Art Buchwald's I Never Danced at the White House and read it and thus learned about Watergate. Art Buchwald was a political humor columnist for the Washington Post. I am imagining some twelve-year-old girl in 2039 reading a Petri collection, getting about 30% of the jokes and enjoying it a lot.)

(Also I should look up whether there is critical scholarship discussing Alexandra Petri, Alexandra Erin, the Toast work of Mallory Ortberg, and whoever else is doing .... this kind of thing in this era. *handwave*)

Sarvinder Naberhaus & Kadir Nelson

Jun. 20th, 2017 04:22 am
[syndicated profile] kirkus_kidlit_feed
To really earn her stripes as a picture book author, Sarvinder Naberhaus submitted several manuscripts, including Blue Sky White Stars, a book inspired by the American flag. She never imagined a superstar would agree to illustrate it.

Commute Not-Graffiti

Jun. 19th, 2017 09:20 am
grrlpup: (rose)
[personal profile] grrlpup

Funny how many things almost count, or sort of count, for my commute graffiti collection.

sign in pickup bed reads THE KIDS ARE ATTEMPTING A CIVIL DISCOURSE ON CURRENT AFFAIRS

cardboard letters on sidewalk I P

This post also appears at read write run repeat. Comments read and welcomed in either place!

Major Milestones for Publishing@W3C

Jun. 19th, 2017 01:06 pm
[syndicated profile] dpub_w3c_feed

Posted by Bill McCoy

publishing groups workflow diagramThe new Publishing@W3C activity was formed in February 2017 when W3C finalized our combination with IDPF (the International Digital Publishing Forum). Over the last four months there’s been a ton of progress. The new Publishing Business Group, the focal point for discussing overall requirements and issues, is up and running, with a kick-off meeting in March in London and bi-weekly calls. The new EPUB 3 Community Group is also up and running, with a full plate of work items to extend the success of the EPUB standard under the auspices of W3C. Over 50 former IDPF member organizations are now participating in Publishing@W3C activities which makes this the fastest and largest expansion of W3C ever in an industry area.

Today, W3C announced two more very significant milestones: the formation of a new Publishing Working Group and the first-ever W3C Publishing Summit, set for November 9-10 in San Francisco.

The mission of the new Publishing Working Group is to “enable all publications — with all their specificities and traditions — to become first-class entities on the Web. The WG will provide the necessary technologies on the Open Web Platform to make the combination of traditional publishing and the Web complete in terms of accessibility, usability, portability, distribution, archiving, offline access, and reliable cross referencing”. That’s an exciting and ambitious goal, and overwhelming support across the W3C membership for the creation of this Working Group is a key proof point for the convergence vision that was the key strategic motivator for the combination of IDPF with W3C.

And in some ways the Publishing Summit is an even more welcome development. As a standards development organization (SDO), W3C’s work product is Web Standards, which are a means to an end: interoperability. These days, the ecosystem around any enabling technology, including especially the Open Web Platform, isn’t just specifications. It’s also open source, testbeds, education and training, and much more; i.e., the holistic ecosystem and the community around it. IDPF was a trade organization for the digital publishing community as well as an SDO, and IDPF’s events including its annual conference were a key part of building the community around the EPUB standard and broader issues in the digital transformation of publishing. I joined W3C as the Publishing Champion not only to help develop standards but also to foster a broader community that will successfully lead the Web to its full potential for the particular needs of publishing and documents. The Publishing Summit will help us build that community, so I hope you’ll join the conversation on November 9-10 in San Francisco.

Overall I’m excited by the progress to date on Publishing@W3C. The opportunities to help enable the future of publishing and the Web are tremendous. And there’s just one thing that we need to make it happen: participation. Thanks are due the many folks who have already pitched in to get the ball rolling, and I hope you’ll join in supporting the Publishing@W3C initiative.

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