[syndicated profile] alaskanlibrarian_feed

Posted by Daniel Cornwall

via Text – S.1444 – 114th Congress (2015-2016): A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to reduce the rate of tax regarding the taxation of distilled spirits. | Congress.gov | Library of Congress.

As Alaska has one of the highest rates of alcoholism, fetal alcohol syndrome and alcohol fueled domestic violence I am very disappointed to see Senator Sullivan co-sponsor this law to reduce taxes on distilled spirits.

As of this writing, the text of the bill was unavailable, so I don’t know how much Senator Sullivan wishes to reduce the tax by. But anything that makes it likely Alaskans will drink even more is probably a bad idea.

For further reading:

Economic Costs of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse in Alaska, 2012. McDowell Group for Alaska Department of Health and Social Services.

Alaska Substance Abuse Prevention Program, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services


Filed under: alaska Tagged: drinking

OMG james rhodes

May. 23rd, 2015 09:26 pm
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
Listening to how he plays piano, blowing my mind. He makes glenn gould sound like a soulless prancing robot pony. I am listening again to beethoven sonata in d major (pastoral) which i played the hell out of in high school (painfully learning bar by bar so i know it really well to listen to) and rhodes is so brilliant with it that I am feeling embarrassed for my attempts to emotionally interpret it. crap! he plays bach so well i'm in tears! good stuff.

New Vid: Pipeline

May. 24th, 2015 03:41 am
[syndicated profile] sumana_feed
I've made a new fanvid: "Pipeline". It's a little over 3 minutes long and cuts together about 50 different sources (documentaries, movies, TV, comics, coding bootcamp ads, and more) over Taylor Swift's song "Blank Space". My launch blog post on Dreamwidth goes into more detail and includes links to download it. You can stream it at Critical Commons (choose View High Quality for best experience) and I embed the video below:

It's CC BY-SA; please feel free to redistribute, link, remix, and so on, as long as you attribute me as the vidder. Comments are welcome, though moderated.

Hiking Treadwell Ditch Trail

May. 24th, 2015 02:55 am
[syndicated profile] alaskanlibrarian_feed

Posted by Daniel Cornwall

image

image

image

Today I hiked part of the Treadwell Ditch Trail on Douglas Island in Juneau Alaska. I accomplished this without getting into a car. I left my house, got to Crowhill Avenue and walked to the end of the paved road. I walked around the gate at the end of the road and after about ten minutes arrived at the Gastineau Meadows Trailhead. I took the switchbacks through mountain meadows to reach the Treadwell Ditch Trail. Then it was a matter of walking uphill for a couple of hours. I saw birds, skunk cabbage, bridges streams. Several times I felt gratitude to Trail Mix, our local trails organization that works with the feds, state and city to maintain our trails. They put in new bridges and reinforce sagging parts of the trail. It was a good reminder that there are some things (like maintain a great trail) we simply can’t do working alone.

I kept walking until just past the trailhead for the Dan Moller Cabin Trail, which splits off from the Treadwell Ditch Trail. It had been about 2.5 hours, so I turned around. Partly because it was a decent turnaround point, but mostly because I was meeting friends for a 1pm lunch and wanted to get home in time to shower and change.

On previous trips up this trail, I made it a loop by taking the Blueberry Hill exit off the trail. This trailhead is in a pricey neighborhood of Douglas and one walks down some steep streets down to Douglas Highway where one can either walk along the highway or wait for a bus. I’ve done both and I’ve always found the walk down on pavement to be hard on my feet. So I decided to simply go back the way I came. It had more roots and rocks, but ultimately more fun than the streets to highway to home path.

I got home around noon, about when I expected to. I’d been gone about five hours and hiked 9.6 miles according to my MapMyWalk app. Part of my wanted to wander around to get that last 0.4 miles to get 10 miles, but my feet wanted nothing to do with that plan. So I stayed home, changed showered and had a lovely lunch with friends at the Sandpiper, probably the best breakfast/lunch place in Juneau.

That’s how I spent my Saturday. How did you spend yours?

References:

Treadwell Ditch Trail

Gastineau Meadows Trail (also includes information on Treadwell Ditch Trail)

Trail Mix

Dan Moller Trail


Filed under: Uncategorized
[syndicated profile] kirkus_kidlit_feed
Picture this: you’re in beautiful Jackson Hole, Wyoming, surrounded by the breathtaking and dramatic Teton mountain range. You visit the National Museum of Wildlife Art, whose building is itself a work of art. Set upon a cliff overlooking the National Elk Refuge, the museum, whose design is inspired by the ruins of Slains Castle in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, is an integral and seamless part of the very landscape itself. You spend a day watching award-winning picture-book illustrators talk to children and their parents about the work they do, after they share their books in story time. This all occurs in the museum itself, which pays tribute to the rich tradition of wildlife art in this country and beyond.

(no subject)

May. 22nd, 2015 01:30 pm
owlectomy: A squashed panda sewing a squashed panda (Default)
[personal profile] owlectomy
I can never decide whether I'm better off for having learned about things like AI risk and Roko's Basilisk.

At least it's a more entertaining thing to worry about when my brain hits the Let's Worry About The Nearest Available Thing track.

Also I will eventually write my postapocalyptic-ish novel about the half-wild girl gang up against the weird/capricious AI that lives in the postorbital satellites and has weird plans for humanity, so there's that.
[syndicated profile] sumana_feed
I've arrived in Madison for WisCon! And just in time for WisCon:

I have a blog post up (in two parts) focusing on the frameworks that we free software/open source folks often take for granted, what might have been erased from our FLOSS intellectual heritage due to sexism, what FLOSS might look like under a different approach, and what practices and perspectives we might borrow from the fan fiction/fanvidding realm of speculative fiction and media fandom.

Part 1 is up at Crooked Timber as the guest post "Where are the women in the history of open source?" Part 2 is up at Geek Feminism as "What if free and open source software were more like fandom?"

Please feel free to comment at CT or GF.

Day 9: Full Circle Ambivalance

May. 22nd, 2015 01:05 pm
[syndicated profile] alaskanlibrarian_feed

Posted by Daniel Cornwall

My wife and I subscribe to an every other week box of fruit and vegetables from Full Circle, an outfit that sources from small farmers and delivers to consumers. They do deliveries in Washington State, Oregon, Alaska, Idaho and the San Francisco Bay Area.

My wife and I have lived in Alaska since 1998. When we lived in the lower 48 we were big fans of farmers markets. Not only did the produce tend to be fresher, we appreciated the chance to support small farmers directly. Both of us feel that keeping some diversity in our food chain is important and that corporations rarely treat individual farming families well.

But Juneau, while technically on the North American mainland, has an island like atmosphere cut off from the road system. And we have a fairly poor growing climate and limited land. We have some great gardeners, but farming on a commercial-scale doesn’t seem feasible. So when Full Circle – then Full Circle Farms – first started offering produce to Juneau, we jumped at the chance. There have been a few periods when we’ve dropped the subscription but we came back.

Generally the produce is of good quality. When it’s not Full Circle is great about issuing credits.  We generally use most of what comes in our box and it’s a greater variety of fruits and vegetables than we would buy for ourselves. As advertised, the food does come from small growers.

So why I am ambivalent? Mostly because of the distances our produce has to travel. Buying organic local produce to be lighter on the Earth doesn’t seem as Earth-friendly once you’re shipping it a thousand miles. Also, Full Circle has gone beyond farms in their state to source stuff from as far away as Mexico. I’m not against foreign produce per se. I do wonder how I can say “I’m supporting local farming families!” If I’m sourcing my produce from foreign countries. On the other hand, they do seem to all be small farmers.

If you subscribe to Full Circle, especially if you’re outside their driving radius, I’d like to hear from you in comments. Do you think subscribing to Full Circle is supporting small farming? Why or why not?

References:

Full Circle

Full Circle food sources

With this post, I surpassed my previous Write. Every. Day. streak of eight days. So now I will stop routinely prefacing my blog posts with the day number except:

1) When I hit certain mileposts, say 30 days of writing every day.

2) When I fall off the wagon and need to restart.


Filed under: Uncategorized

New vid: "Pipeline"

May. 23rd, 2015 10:35 pm
brainwane: My smiling face in front of a brick wall, May 2015. (Default)
[personal profile] brainwane
Title: Pipeline
Vidder: Sumana Harihareswara ("brainwane")
Fandom: Multi (documentaries, movies, TV, comics, coding bootcamp ads, and more)
Music: "Blank Space", Taylor Swift
Length: 3 minutes, 11 seconds
Summary: The tech industry has a blank space, and is quite eager to write your name.
Content notes: Implied verbal/emotional abuse, a few seconds of very fast cutting around 1:50
License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike (CC BY-SA)
Download: on Google Drive (165 MB high-res MP4, 23 MB low-res MP4, 98 MB AVI), or at Critical Commons with login (high- and low-res MP4 and WebM files)
Stream: at Critical Commons (choose View High Quality for best experience)
Subtitles file: http://www.harihareswara.net/vids/pipeline.srt

Premiered just now at WisCon 2015 (the vid party).

Embedded video below:

Sources:
50 sources (28 video, 22 still) )


Thank you to my betas:


  • Skud
  • seekingferret
  • were_duck
  • Leonard Richardson
  • Teresa Nielsen Hayden
  • and others.

Feelings and interpretation:
You don't need to read this )
Making-of:
About 75 hours over 2 months )

This vid is under CC BY-SA and I hope people feel free to remix it, redistribute it, and otherwise enjoy it, as long as they attribute me as the vidder.

Stories Are Never Simple

May. 21st, 2015 05:40 pm
[syndicated profile] kirkus_ya_feed
That’s the thing about baseball, though, is it lays you bare: play long enough and eventually who you really are will show through.
[syndicated profile] alaskanlibrarian_feed

Posted by Daniel Cornwall

Today marks my tie with my previous longest streak in Write. Every. Day.

As a result of a purchase on Humble Bundle, I wound up reading the e-book:

Lang, David, and Rebecca Demarest. 2013. Zero to maker: learn (just enough) to make (just about) anything.

From the WorldCat summary:

“Are you possessed by the urge to invent, design, and make something that others enjoy, but don’t know how to plug into the Maker movement? In this book, you’ll follow author David Lang’s headfirst dive into the Maker world and how he grew to be a successful entrepreneur. You’ll discover how to navigate this new community, and find the best resources for learning the tools and skills you need to be a dynamic maker in your own right. Lang reveals how he became a pro maker after losing his job, and how the experience helped him start OpenROV–a DIY community and product line focused on open source undersea exploration. It all happened once he became an active member of the Maker culture. Ready to take the plunge into the next Industrial Revolution? This guide provides a clear and inspiring roadmap.”

I found this book to be mostly interesting and inspiring. Mr. Lang hooks you with the first chapter that begins in a cave surrounded by foul weather. A robot descends into deep water. The inventors are excited to see their product working. Then Lang tells us that just months prior, he was a Silicon Valley social media minion with no manual skills. He got laid off and was envious of people with back-up manual skills like carpentry. He resolves to “re-skill himself.” Most of the rest of the book is his story of finding people in the Maker movement, apprenticing with some of them, taking classes at Makerspaces and elsewhere. There are sections of the book that offer advice on finding maker groups, creating your own workshop and how to go about starting a business as a Maker. The sections that focus on how particular people got involved with Maker culture were the most interesting to me. The chapters later in the book about the mechanics of finding business funding and considerations about filing patents were less so. That probably says more about me than the author.

Mr. Lang was ultimately successful in reskilling himself and is a main partner in the OpenROV project. So his book a legitimate story of being a zero (manual skills wise) to a Maker. If you’re looking for a book to inspire you to pick up new skills, have fun and join a global movement, this book is for you.

References:

Humble Bundle

OpenROV (Underwater Exploration Robots) project


Filed under: Uncategorized
[syndicated profile] alaskanlibrarian_feed

Posted by Daniel Cornwall

The sun continues to shine down on Juneau. I took the opportunity to walk home tonight. I strolled along the water front for most of the way, soaking in details that I miss when I drive. The ships in the channel, the state of the tide, the wildflowers beginning to bloom. There were people jogging and washing their cars. The sky was very blue, but I can tell that from a car. I could have stopped and taken pictures, but I was running the MapMyWalk app and I wanted to see if I could hit three miles an hour in walking. Turns out I could. But maybe I would have been better served by moving even slowly and trying to capture some of the beauty that is Southeast Alaska.


Filed under: Uncategorized

Some vids I learned from

May. 23rd, 2015 10:32 pm
brainwane: My smiling face in front of a brick wall, May 2015. (Default)
[personal profile] brainwane
I started watching fanvids at WisCon 2009, thanks to Skud, and particularly loved a few, such as "What About", "Starships!" and its monochromatic remix, "Grapevine Fires", "Hey Ho", and "Us". Once I decided to make "Pipeline", I started rewatching and seeking out vids with a political message, multifandom/multisource vids, ambitious vids, and vids that used still photos, screencasts, comics, and similar material well. I took notes, sometimes brief and sometimes detailed, of lessons I took from those vids (especially particularly fine-grained "how do you do that" bits of technique). This feels like something to share.

With some arbitrary categorization for ease of skimming, here are some vids I learned from:

Using stills well
three vids )


Ambition
four and a half vids )


Multisource/multifandom
six vids )


Message
two vids )


Other

And of course I learned from a ton of other sources, like a ton of meta about vidding, and Tony Zhou's "Every Frame a Painting" video series, and the scores of vids I've watched over the years. Anyway, hope someone finds this of interest.

WisCon Schedule

May. 20th, 2015 07:55 pm
[syndicated profile] sumana_feed
I'll be at WisCon starting tomorrow and leaving on Tuesday. I am scheduled to participate in these sessions:
  1. Imaginary Book Club, Fri, 4:00-5:15 pm in Conference 2. Five panelists discuss books that don't exist, improvising critiques and responses. I proposed this panel a few years ago (you can see video of its debut) and it has continued, which is cool!
  2. Lighthearted Shorthand Sans Fail, Sat, 8:30-9:45 am in Capitol A. What are your go-to phrasings to avoid sexism, ableism, etc. while getting your point across in casual conversation? I hope to walk out of this with some new vocabulary to replace bad habits.
  3. Vid Party, Saturday night 9:00 pm-Sun, 3:00 am in room 629. I am premiering a fanvid. Once it's premiered, I'll hit Post on blog posts to announce it publicly as well.
  4. Call Out Culture II: Follow-up to the Discussion Held at WisCon 38, Sun, 10:00-11:15 am in Senate A. Meta-discussion around discourse in social justice movements. I predict this session will be pretty intense.
  5. Vid Party Discussion, Sun, 1:00-2:15 pm in Assembly. We will discuss some of the vids shown at the vid party, and fan vids in general. This will be the first time I've engaged in public realtime conversation about fanvids. Before this panel I hope to publish some notes about what I learned from watching several vids that drew from multiple sources (including stills), made a political point, or were otherwise particularly ambitious. I'll probably reference those lessons during the panel.

I also proposed "What Does Feminist Tech Education Look Like?", "Impostor Syndrome Training Exercise", and "Entry Level Discussion Group", but am not a panelist or presenter for those sessions; I bet they'll be interesting, though, and you could do worse than to check them out. You can read Entry Level ahead of time for free online.

I look like the photo to the left. I am often bad with names, and will remember 5 minutes into our conversation that we had an awesome deep conversation three years prior. I apologize in advance.

If you are good at clothes, consider joining me at the Clothing Swap portion of the Gathering on Friday afternoon to help me find pieces that suit me. I'm introducing two old pals to WisCon and spending a lot of time with them (we live in different cities), and they're both white, so I might not be able to come to the People of Color dinner on Friday night. And sadly, The Floomp dance party on Saturday happens during the Vid Party so I probably can't attend that. I did buy a ticket for the Dessert Salon and will attend the Guest of Honor and Tiptree Award speeches on Sunday, and maybe you will be at my table!

One of my pals who's coming to WisCon is Beth Lerman, an artist who will be displaying and selling her work in the art show. Check it out!

Also I am open to doing a small room performance of my half-hour geeky stand-up comedy routine if several people ask for it. I don't know when or where it would be; Monday night would be easiest. Speak up in comments or some other medium if you'd be interested.

WisCon Schedule

May. 20th, 2015 02:55 pm
brainwane: My smiling face in front of a brick wall, May 2015. (Default)
[personal profile] brainwane
I'll be at WisCon starting tomorrow and leaving on Tuesday. I am scheduled to participate in these sessions:

  1. Imaginary Book Club, Fri, 4:00-5:15 pm in Conference 2. Five panelists discuss books that don't exist, improvising critiques and responses. I proposed this panel a few years ago (you can see video of its debut) and it has continued, which is cool!
  2. Lighthearted Shorthand Sans Fail, Sat, 8:30-9:45 am in Capitol A. What are your go-to phrasings to avoid sexism, ableism, etc. while getting your point across in casual conversation? I hope to walk out of this with some new vocabulary to replace bad habits.
  3. Vid Party, Saturday night 9:00 pm-Sun, 3:00 am in room 629. I am premiering a fanvid. Once it's premiered, I'll hit Post on blog posts to announce it publicly as well.
  4. Call Out Culture II: Follow-up to the Discussion Held at WisCon 38, Sun, 10:00-11:15 am in Senate A. Meta-discussion around discourse in social justice movements. I predict this session will be pretty intense.
  5. Vid Party Discussion, Sun, 1:00-2:15 pm in Assembly. We will discuss some of the vids shown at the vid party, and fan vids in general. This will be the first time I've engaged in public realtime conversation about fanvids. Before this panel I hope to publish some notes about what I learned from watching several vids that drew from multiple sources (including stills), made a political point, or were otherwise particularly ambitious. I'll probably reference those lessons during the panel.

I also proposed "What Does Feminist Tech Education Look Like?", "Impostor Syndrome Training Exercise", and "Entry Level Discussion Group", but am not a panelist or presenter for those sessions; I bet they'll be interesting, though, and you could do worse than to check them out. You can read Entry Level ahead of time for free online.

I look like the photo to the left. I am often bad with names, and will remember 5 minutes into our conversation that we had an awesome deep conversation three years prior. I apologize in advance.

If you are good at clothes, consider joining me at the Clothing Swap portion of the Gathering on Friday afternoon to help me find pieces that suit me. I'm introducing two old pals to WisCon and spending a lot of time with them (we live in different cities), and they're both white, so I might not be able to come to the People of Color dinner on Friday night. And sadly, The Floomp dance party on Saturday happens during the Vid Party so I probably can't attend that. I did buy a ticket for the Dessert Salon and will attend the Guest of Honor and Tiptree Award speeches on Sunday, and maybe you will be at my table!

One of my pals who's coming to WisCon is Beth Lerman, an artist who will be displaying and selling her work in the art show. Check it out!

Also I am open to doing a small room performance of my half-hour geeky stand-up comedy routine if several people ask for it. I don't know when or where it would be; Monday night would be easiest. Speak up in comments or some other medium if you'd be interested.


[Cross-posted from Cogito, Ergo Sumana]

(no subject)

May. 20th, 2015 11:49 am
owlectomy: A squashed panda sewing a squashed panda (Default)
[personal profile] owlectomy
I am at a meeting for Summer Reading. At the break they passed a pipe cleaner out to everybody, and then we listened to Jackson Bird from the Harry Potter Alliance, and then the person who heads the library division for children with special needs, and by the time she came on I was starting to get fidgety. I moved through yelling at myself to not fidget with the pipe cleaner, to get distracted and being horrified to look down and find my folded and twisted pipe cleaner, to rushing to untwist it... and finally, it was time to explain what the pipe cleaner was for.

It was for explaining what fidget toys are and how you can give out pipe cleaners to use as fidget toys.

Apparently they are now called chenille sticks.

Mountain Goats video of the day

May. 20th, 2015 07:51 am
tim: text: "I'm not offended, I'm defiant" (defiant)
[personal profile] tim


I wrote before about the Mountain Goats' song "The Legend of Chavo Guerrero". The official video for it just got released, starring the members of the band and Chavo Guerrero himself.

I can't stop watching this.

Day 6 – No Escape From Culture

May. 20th, 2015 03:57 am
[syndicated profile] alaskanlibrarian_feed

Posted by Daniel Cornwall

I’d like to think that I don’t perceive things differently depending on whether a man or woman does them. Every once in awhile something comes along to rudely remind me that I have been molded to see some things through a gendered lens.

For those of you living in a cave, the video above is for Taylor Swift’s “Blank Space.” I love the song and I think the video is great. My favorite part of the video is when she looks into the camera and says, ” ‘Cause darling, I am a nightmare dressed as a daydream.” The rest of the video has her cutting up her boyfriend’s clothes, ripping up paintings she had made of him and finally just beating the crap out of his car with a golf club. I laughed the first several times and if I was single, I still would have been tempted to obey Taylor’s instructions to “grab your passport and my hand.” Not that I’m EVER Taylor Swift’s type in any reality.

But .. after about the fifth go round, I mentally flipped the genders of the couple in the video. If Taylor was a guy, bragging about his ex lovers who swore he was insane, I’d wonder what the woman was doing there. If it got the point where the guy was shredding the woman’s clothes and wrecking her car — not funny. Not something we want to show, really. Not for laughs anyway.

And yet I did laugh as did many others. I’m claiming this is a cultural thing instead of my character flaw due to the lack of outrage from anyone over “Blank Space.” I’m positive there would be an outcry if some male pop star did a cover of Swift’s video.

I’m not saying we should damn Taylor Swift or demand the retraction of the video. We might want to take the opportunity to reflect on what we feel is appropriate gender behavior and why.


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: culture, gender

Don't use Dropbox

May. 19th, 2015 06:29 pm
tim: Tim with short hair, smiling, wearing a black jacket over a white T-shirt (Default)
[personal profile] tim
If Condoleezza Rice being on the board of directors wasn't enough for you, if their employees literally bullying children in San Francisco wasn't enough for you, hear me out here. I'm currently permanently locked out of my Dropbox account containing years' worth of photos because a phone repair place destroyed my phone and I had 2-factor authentication enabled. No good deed goes unpunished, I guess!

Other services, such as pobox.com, will reset 2FA if you send them a notarized letter proving your identity. Not Dropbox, though! Here's the response I received from their support team when I asked the following:
I'm surprised by this response, since pobox.com was able to reset my 2FA when I sent them a notarized letter confirming my identity. Is there a reason that Dropbox wouldn't be able to accept such a letter from me as proof of my identity?


And here's the response I received:

Hello Tim,

Thanks for getting back to me! Apologies for the delay in my response- I had passed along your request to several of my teammates to look into as well. Unfortunately, we have no method to verify your identity and disable two-step verification if you do not have any of the following:

1. a linked computer or mobile device
2. your 16-digit emergency backup code
3. a backup phone number on file that can receive text messages

As noted, for security purposes, if you can't enter the six-digit code from your phone, and you didn't store the 16-digit emergency backup code, we have no way to help you regain access to your Dropbox account. We can't turn off two-step verification for you because email alone is no longer sufficient to prove your identity. The best we can do is help you make a new account and transfer any paid credit and bonus space you've earned. But we can't transfer any files.

If you create a new account, please reply with that account's email address so that I can help you further.

Dropbox doesn't care about your data. They will deny access to your data because they're too lazy to open a letter from a paying customer. If you don't think that's okay, don't use Dropbox. (By the way, can anyone recommend a cloud backup service that cares about customer data?)
[syndicated profile] aotus_feed

Posted by davidferriero

Last week I had an opportunity to visit with Dave Joens and his staff at the Illinois State Archives—the first AOTUS to visit since Wayne Grover was there in 1952.  Dave and I were able to reenact the original photo op at the same catalogue drawer!

Archives-Norton 1953

 

Dave Joens and AOTUS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret Cross Norton was the first State Archivist of Illinois from 1922 until 1957.  She was a co-founder of the Society of American Archivists, served in SAA leadership roles for many years, and edited American Archivist from 1946 to 1949.  Her “Catalog Rules: Series for Archives Material” trained generations of archivists.

She fought the good fight distinguishing archives from libraries and historical societies:

“One might conclude…that the ideal archivist is a scholar sitting in a remote ivory tower safeguarding records of interest only to the historian.  In reality the archivist is at the very heart of his government and the archival establishment is a vital cog in its governmental machinery.  Archives are legal records the loss of which might cause serious loss to citizens or the government.”

In the mid-1950s, Grover was working on “The Archivist’s Credo” (later Code) and sent drafts out for review.  Our records are rich with the correspondence between Norton and Grover. She challenges language and basic principles, addresses the non-partisan nature of government archives, and makes it clear that archivists are hired to process and serve archives and not to research their own scholarship!

An added general comment to the draft:

“Probably this also does not belong in the code, but I would say that the most important single need for the archivist is for a strong sense of order.  Disorder must worry him.  I don’t think enough emphasis has been placed upon this in the training of archivists.”

Page generated May. 24th, 2015 06:58 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios